Description

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Climate change is already seriously impacting our lives in many ways. Threats to human and natural systems will increase as our planet continues to warm. This program will explore mathematical, statistical and computational strategies to better understand both the changes to the climate system and the associated impacts. A series of workshops will focus on climate models, detection and attribution of climate change, extreme weather and climate events, remote sensing, machine learning, and the economic consequences of climate change. This program aims to foster new multidisciplinary collaborations and integrate young scientists and researchers into industry, private sector, and academic research through these workshops and embedded research projects with affiliated universities, national laboratories, and private industry.

Organizers

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DG
Dimitris Giannakis Mathematics, New York University
VMH
Vera Mikyoung Hur Mathematics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
B L
Bo Li Statistics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
R L
Robert Lund Statistics, University of California, Santa Cruz
R R
Robert Rosner Astrophysics/Physics, University of Chicago
R S
Ryan Sriver Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
M W
Michael Wehner Computational Research, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

Program Workshops

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Workshop
Climate and Weather Extremes
expanded

Weather and climate extremes profoundly impact human society and the natural environment across the globe. Recent years have seen an increase in economic losses due to climate and weather extremes, particularly from extremes in different variables that occur simultaneously in space and time, so called compound extremes. Researchers typically study climate and weather extremes from different perspectives. The statistics and applied math communities have focused on theory and methods for extreme values. In contrast, atmospheric scientists have focused on quantifying changes in extremes and understanding the mechanism behind them. Both approaches are crucial for understanding and mitigating the frequency and magnitude of extremes. The workshop will bring together researchers from both communities in order to advance our understanding of the mechanisms causing climate and weather extremes and to find novel approaches to mitigate climate change and its impacts.